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SearchCap: PPC policies, Google Assistant failovers & voice interfaces

Below is what happened in search today, as reported on Search Engine Land and from other places across the web.

The post SearchCap: PPC policies, Google Assistant failovers & voice interfaces appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

Reblogged 5 hours ago from feeds.searchengineland.com

Are You Marketing Effectively Across Generational Lines? [New Data]

You’ve heard it from us before:

  • “The way consumers prefer to access content has changed.”
  • “We’re seeing a fundamental shift in the way we market and sell products.”
  • “Buyers are no longer okay with outbound emails and cold calls. Instead, marketers need to create and deliver content that meets the consumer where they already are.”

While all of those things are true, you may want to know which preferences have changed and how to meet consumers where they already are, right?

After all, not all consumers have the same preferences. Marketing is not a one-sized-fits-all-solution.

Our HubSpot Research team knows that marketers need more information on what consumers want. But we also know that not all consumers have the same preferences. That’s why every year our Research team surveys consumers from all over the world to collect original data on content consumption preferences.

What stood out this year is this: while the average consumer preferences might show certain trends, you need to get granular with your data if you want to truly understand how different segments of consumers interact. Namely, consumers in different age groups have vastly different preferences when it comes to consuming, accessing, and discover content.

For example, millennials, an age group which roughly spans 18 to 34, aren’t just buying sneakers and gadgets anymore. Increasingly, millennials comprise a cohort of people purchasing homes, baby clothing, and B2B software. And their strong preference for video, social, and mobile-first content has implications for marketers working across an expanding array of industries.

Are you marketing effectively to different age demographics? Let’s dig in and find out.

Mobile First

For years, we’ve heard hype about mobile taking over desktop in traffic and search. But is the increase in mobile usage because everyone is using mobile more, or is it really just that certain age groups are?

Below, you can see the breakdown of device usage by age. Overall, mobile usage beats out desktop by only 5%, but when you break the data down by age group, the differences are clearer: it’s not everyone, it’s young people. 

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Mobile phones are an integral part of modern life. Consumers aren’t just using their phones to browse the internet when they’re commuting or on the go. Many admit they use their phones before they sleep, after they wake up, and even in the bathroom throughout the day.

Content trends 1 report-01

 

Delivery and Discovery

What about accessing content? How do age groups differ in the way that they access or search for content?

Unsurprisingly, consumers in all age groups go to Google and Facebook to catch up on news and lifestyle stories. However, this is true even more so for younger age groups, while older age groups are still more likely to access stories via publication websites, mobile notifications, and email newsletters.

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Format Preferences

What about your content creation efforts?

HubSpot Research also found clear differences in the content formats age groups prefer to access. Namely, millennial respondents show the strongest preference for video and social content.

In contrast, Gen X and Boomers prefer more news articles, research reports, and email content. Most traditional written content teams still have interested readers, they just might have more interetested readers in the older age brackets.

Content trends 1 report-07

The Death of Email

Lots of brands, including HubSpot, have been discussing whether email is “dead.” While we think email is still a valuable channel when used wisely, that’s not to say every audience wants to see more email over other channels. Millennials want to see more videos from brands they support and far fewer want to see emails.

Meanwhile, more Gen Xers want emails/newsletters from a brand than any other type of content.

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Content consumption preferences have changed over time.

However, much of that change has to do with what different age groups are used to consuming. As millennials get older, we’ll very naturally see a shift towards their content consumption preferences. Remember, though, This is true for every new generation. Marketers have to adjust their marketing patterns to the way consumers buy, sell, and consume. 

We’ve talked through some of the main trends by age group, but what about other trends? What about ad creative preferences, geographic differences, and ways of audience engagement?

HubSpot and Ceros recently teamed up to create a fully-interactive guide on the most important Content Marketing secrets of 2018. In it, you can unlock additional data we haven’t yet covered in this blog post. Click here to unlock 10 Content Marketing Secrets Every Marketer Should Know in 2018

Unlock 10 Data-Backed Content Marketing Secrets to Use in 2018

 
Unlock 10 Data-Backed Content Marketing Secrets to Use in 2018

Reblogged 10 hours ago from blog.hubspot.com

How to Use VLOOKUP in Excel 2013 and 2016 [Video Tutorial Included]

This post is an excerpt from the video series 4 Essential Microsoft Excel Skills Every Marketer Should Learn. If you want to become a master of the almighty spreadsheet, watch the full video series here.

I know, I know … “VLOOKUP function” sounds like the geekiest, most complicated thing ever.

But trust me: as was the case with pivot tables, Microsoft Excel’s VLOOKUP function is easier to use than you think. What’s more, it is incredibly powerful, and is definitely something you want to have in your arsenal of analytical weapons.

So, what does VLOOKUP do, exactly? Here’s the simple explanation: The VLOOKUP function searches for a specific value in your data, and once it identifies that value, it can find — and display — some other piece of information that’s associated with that value.

In practical terms, this means you can take the revenue data from your second spreadsheet and integrate it with the customer data in your first spreadsheet in order to reveal the bigger picture about your business’s performance.

Below, you’ll see a five-step guide to performing this VLOOKUP example, followed by a video tutorial for using VLOOKUP to organize a list of blog posts.

How Does VLOOKUP Work?

The secret to how VLOOKUP works? Unique identifiers.

A unique identifier is a piece of information that both of your data sources share, and — as its name implies — it is unique (i.e. the identifier is only associated with one record in your database). Unique identifiers include product codes, stock keeping units (SKUs), and customer contacts.

Since HubSpot and most CRMs both use email addresses to uniquely identify the contacts in their databases, HubSpot customers can use “email address” as their unique identifier to execute a VLOOKUP.

Steps to Using VLOOKUP in Excel

Take the VLOOKUP example above. Let’s say you’re looking through your HubSpot data and are checking out which of your site pages your contacts have viewed. You’re also paying attention to whether or not any of those contacts have converted into customers.

Then it hits you: In addition to knowing which of those contacts have closed, you want to know how much MRR (monthly recurring revenue) each of them brings in. That way, you can tie your revenue back to your site pages and do some analysis to see which pages are having the biggest impact on your bottom line.

There’s only one problem: Your MRR data lives in your CRM. And while you could manually look up each and every contact in your CRM to find their MRR, and then manually match those values to their corresponding contacts in your HubSpot data, the whole process would be ridiculously time-consuming and impractical.

That’s where the VLOOKUP function comes in. For your reference, here’s what a VLOOKUP function looks like:

VLOOKUP(lookup_value , table_array , col_index_num , range_lookup)

In the steps below, we’ll assign the right value to each of these components, using customer names as our unique identifier to find the MRR of each customer.

Step 1: Identify a Column of Cells You’d Like to Fill With New Data

Entering a new column title in Excel in order to use the VLOOKUP function

If this data is coming from a pivot table made in Excel, copy the data into a new spreadsheet so the VLOOKUP function can freely read this data.

Then, label a column next to the cells you want more information on with a proper title in the top cell, such as “MRR,” for monthly recurring revenue. This new column is where the data you’re fetching will go.

Step 2: Select ‘Function’ (Fx) > VLOOKUP and Enter Your Starting Cell

Function (Fx) icon in Excel, which accesses the VLOOKUP formula builder

To the left of the text bar above your spreadsheet, you’ll see a small function icon that looks like a script “Fx.” Click on the first empty cell beneath your column title and then click this function icon.

Select “VLOOKUP” from the list of options that appears, and then re-click the cell you’ve highlighted and enter the cell you’re trying to find a match for. In this case, it’s A2. You’ll start migrating your new data into E2, since this cell represents the MRR of the customer name listed in A2.

Step 3: Enter the Table Array and Column Number You’re Searching Through

      

Then, next to the “table array” field, enter the range of cells you’d like to search and the sheet where these cells are located. The VLOOKUP form will help you fetch the correct page.

Beneath this field, you’ll also enter the “column index number” of the table array you’re searching through. For example, if you’re focusing on columns B through K (notated “B:K” when entered in the “table array” field), but the specific values you want are in column K, you’ll enter “10” in the “column index number” field, since column K is the 10th column from the left.

Step 4: Enter Your Range Lookup

In contexts like monthly revenue, you want to find exact matches from the table you’re searching through. To do this, enter ‘FALSE’ in the “range lookup” field. This tells Excel you want to find only the exact revenue associated with each sales contact.

Step 5: Click ‘Done’ (or ‘Enter’) and Fill Your New Column

In order to officially bring in the values you want into your new column from Step 1, click “Done” (or “Enter,” depending on your version of Excel) after filling the “range lookup” field. This will populate your first cell. You might take this opportunity to look in the other spreadsheet to make sure this was the correct value. 

Entering the first new value from Excel's VLOOKUP formula builder

If so, populate the rest of the new column with each subsequent value by clicking the first filled cell, then clicking the tiny square that appears on the bottom-right corner of this cell. Done! All your values should appear.

Filling a new column with data from Excel's VLOOKUP formula builder

Alright, enough explanation: let’s see another example of the VLOOKUP in action!

In the video below, we’re taking the pivot table we made in video #2, pasting the values into a new sheet, and using it as an example report. We then use the VLOOKUP function to match blog post authors (from our second data source) to their corresponding post titles. In this instance, we’re using post title as our unique identifier.

Author’s note: Keep in mind there are many different versions of Excel, so what you see in the video above might not always match up exactly with what you’ll see in your version. That’s why we encourage you to download the written instructions and demo data so you can follow along.

Download demo data | Download instructions (Mac) | Download instructions (PC)

Want to learn to do more in Excel? Download the full video series, 4 Essential Microsoft Excel Skills Every Marketer Should Learn.

Reblogged 10 hours ago from blog.hubspot.com

Sarcasm aside, how strict PPC advertiser policies may actually benefit us

Contributor Andrew Goodman suggests we may not like the way Google manages the AdWords program, but anything less and the SERPs and advertising ecosystem would have imploded long ago.

The post Sarcasm aside, how strict PPC advertiser policies may actually benefit us appeared first on Search Engine…

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

Reblogged 19 hours ago from feeds.searchengineland.com

Voice agents and interfaces will require many new marketing strategies

Marketers are only now getting a glimpse of the many approaches that will be required for the many kinds of voice interactivity.

The post Voice agents and interfaces will require many new marketing strategies appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

Reblogged 19 hours ago from feeds.searchengineland.com

Marketing Day: Facebook reopens app reviews, Adobe buys Sayspring & Snapchat’s Shoppable AR Lenses

Here’s our recap of what happened in online marketing today, as reported on Marketing Land and other places across the web.

The post Marketing Day: Facebook reopens app reviews, Adobe buys Sayspring & Snapchat’s Shoppable AR Lenses appeared first on Marketing Land.

Please visit Marketing Land for the full article.

Reblogged 1 day ago from feeds.marketingland.com

Amazon Launches Seller Central Sponsored Products Dashboard

Amazon has released a new dashboard feature for the Seller Central marketing platform. Found in the Seller Central campaign manager, the dashboard makes it easier than ever to visualize your campaign data and take away valuable insights from your Amazon marketing account.

Read more at PPCHero.com

Reblogged 1 day ago from feedproxy.google.com

Why You Should Utilize a Facebook Catalog For Vehicle Sales

Set yourself up for future success by building a vehicle catalog on Facebook. From remarketing to prospecting, get your inventory in front of buyers and automate the process of ad creation.

Read more at PPCHero.com

Reblogged 1 day ago from feedproxy.google.com

Compare 15 marketing automation platforms

Marketing organizations of all sizes are being inundated by data from multiple digital marketing channels and an increasing number of consumer devices. Faced with challenging market dynamics and increasing ROI pressure, more B2B marketers are using marketing automation platforms to manage complex…

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

Reblogged 1 day ago from feeds.searchengineland.com

SearchCap: Google new video ad format, SEO checklists & more

Below is what happened in search today, as reported on Search Engine Land and from other places across the web.

The post SearchCap: Google new video ad format, SEO checklists & more appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

Reblogged 1 day ago from feeds.searchengineland.com