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Twitter to test ‘hide replies’ feature

Facebook

The feature will be available for Canadian Twitter users. It’ll allow users to create a separate page to make unwanted replies to their tweets less visible.

Read more here. Read more…

More about Tech, Twitter, Mashable Video, Social Media, and Tech

Reblogged 20 hours ago from feeds.mashable.com

A conversation with your therapist is the most relatable new meme

Facebook

In case you haven’t heard, being sad, depressed, and anxious online is kind of trendy now.  

It’s perfectly acceptable to tweet about being tired, single, or embarrassed. It’s fine to post an Instagram Story about your exasperating commute. And, as the latest meme making the rounds on social media confirms, it’s even cool (and extremely relatable) to openly discuss therapy.

The new self-deprecating meme imagines a conversation between you and a therapist. Upon being asked, “And what do we say when we feel like this?” you respond with something that clearly misses the mark, and your therapist then shows disapproval.  Read more…

More about Memes, Social Media, Therapist, Culture, and Web Culture

Reblogged 20 hours ago from feeds.mashable.com

Amazon’s got a PPC lock on “Prime Day”

Whether by choice or not isn’t clear, but competitors are sitting on the sidelines of “prime day” ad auctions.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

Reblogged 21 hours ago from feeds.searchengineland.com

Google made 3,200 changes to search in the past year

Do not sit idle. As Google continues to make changes, you should continue to invest in improving your web site.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

Reblogged 21 hours ago from feeds.searchengineland.com

3 Content Marketing Don’ts from a Grocery Store Solicitor

A grocery store solicitor is a nuisance because grocery shopping isn’t typically a leisurely activity. The shopper needs to get…

Continue Reading

The post 3 Content Marketing Don’ts from a Grocery Store Solicitor appeared first on Copyblogger.

Reblogged 1 day ago from feeds.copyblogger.com

10 How-To Videos That Really Work (And Why)

Have you ever learned how to do something with the help of an internet search?

The answer is most likely a resounding “yes.” Most recently, I taught myself how to fold a fitted sheet with a helpful video from homemaker extraordinaire, and friend of Snoop Dogg, Martha Stewart.

Videos are an especially compelling way to learn how to do something online because, well, the video shows you exactly how to do it. I’m not alone here, either — most customers would prefer to watch a marketing video rather than seeing an ad.

So if you’re among the 45% of marketers who are adding video content to their strategy this year, there could be a lot of value in making videos specifically for those in your audience who are trying to learn how to do something, too.

In this post, we’ll explore just how popular these searches are on YouTube and other platforms, and what you can learn from eight how-to videos about how to make great teaching videos of your own.

How-To Video Searches Are Popular

How-to searches are incredibly popular. Think about just your own life for a moment, and reconsider my question at the beginning of this blog post. They also may be a great opportunity for brands to show off their products.

According to WyzOwl’s 2018 Video Marketing Statistics Report, 72% of people prefer to learn about a product or service through video.

Video marketing is growing, and so is the number of platforms it can be seen on. While Youtube and Vimeo used to be the primary place to find videos, consumers now similarly use social platforms like Facebook and Instagram to learn about brands and products.

10 How-To Videos to Learn From

1. How to Fold a Fitted Sheet

You may recognize the title of this how-to video — it’s the one I mentioned earlier in this very blog post. Are you always geting stymied when putting away fitted sheets on laundry day like me?

What I love about this video is how it showcases personality. It’s a simple how-to video of humans demonstrating how to do something, without any animations or high tech features, but it’s still extremely effective at teaching the viewer. Stewart and her guests make jokes about how hard it is to fold the sheet — Stewart even joking that her inability to do so led to her divorce — and they show the viewer how easy it is to get tripped up in the process. Stewart and her guests also have empathy for the viewer and show exactly how to avoid pitfalls along the way.

Takeaway for marketers If you want to create a how-to video “hosted” by a real, live human, make sure they act like a human. Videos are an easy way for brands to showcase personality, so put yourself in the shoes of your viewer, and infuse humor, sincerity, and empathy into your instructions. If the concept you’re explaining is complicated, tell the viewer that. If you had no idea how to use your product at first, share that. Speaking like a human — instead of reading off a script like a robot — will make your video memorable, effective, and enjoyable, too.

2. How to Cook Perfect Pasta

Tasty on BuzzFeed shares cooking and recipe videos that frequently go viral on YouTube and other social media and reach millions of people every month. But this video isn’t one of Tasty’s trademark recipe videos — it’s one of several how-to videos that break down common or difficult cooking skills step-by-step.

In this video, Tasty uses hyperlapse to speed up the cooking demonstration and get the viewer the information they need as quickly as possible. This fast-paced filming style is eye-catching if it starts auto-playing in a social media feed, too. Tasty chose a smart how-to search term, too — there’s a ton of search volume around the phrase “how to cook pasta.”

Takeaway for marketers: Viewers prefer YouTube videos on the shorter side, so sped-up hyperlapse filming helps conserve time and creates a neat visual effect. Work backward and conduct keyword research to learn what terms your audience is searching for to find a topic to make your video about.

3. How to Escape Quicksand

Evidently, Princess Buttercup’s tragic fall into quicksand in The Princess Bride wouldn’t have been quite as terrifying in real life.

In this how-to video, Tech Insider uses captions and animations to break down a complicated concept. I wasn’t exactly searching for information on how to escape quicksand when I found this video, but the unique subject matter made me instantly click, intrigued. What’s more, the sound isn’t required — although it does add dramatic effect — which might make people more likely to click and watch all the way through, since many social media videos are watched on mute.

Takeaway for marketers: Your how-to videos don’t necessarily need to be about a dry topic related to your industry. If you create a fascinating piece of content that goes viral, you’ll generate interest in your brand that way. Animations and captions help to show — rather than explain — trickier concepts like quicksand, so consider these visual elements for high-level explanations. And if there’s a way to make your videos volume-agnostic, do so. Some videos will require narration or other sounds, but the visual elements mentioned previously could do the talking for you.

4. How to Blow Out Curly Hair

Anyone who’s ever gotten a blowout knows that it can be expensive and time-consuming to have it professionally done.

So Bustle cleverly made a how-to video that teaches viewers how to DIY and save money– a motivating factor behind many how-to online searches, I suspect. This video is also short, which MiniMatters suggests for enticing viewers to watch videos all the way through. YouTube counts a view as once a video has been watched for approximately 30 seconds, so viewers with short attention spans might be more likely to stick around for that long if they see a video is shorter, like this one.

Takeaway for marketers: Almost everybody wants to save money where they can, so think about ways your how-to video could help viewers do that when brainstorming topics. When filming, try to keep videos as short as possible to attract viewers and keep them watching all the way through to steadily increase your number of YouTube views.

5. How to Style a Blazer 3 Ways

 
 
 

 
 
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Who doesn’t love blazers? More than just an office staple, a blazer can dress up any outfit with ease. In this episode of #ThePreviewEdit, our Associate Social Media Editor @mauraisabelr shows you how to style it for the office and beyond! Blazer from @forme Video by @mauraisabelr #blazer #fashion #style #tutorial #howto #stylingvideo

A post shared by Preview.ph (@previewph) on Jul 8, 2019 at 8:02pm PDT

In this short, sweet Instagram video, verified style influencer @PreviewPH shows off three ways to style a blazer from ForMe. This video is great for those who are interested in trying out new fashions but don’t exactly know how to wear items or accessories. In this video, she demonstrates three ways of wearing a blazer, which could accommodate the fashion styles of three different people.

Takeaway for marketers: How-to videos can be a great way to show off how a product works and how it can be used. This type of video is clearly promoting one specific blazer and brand, but it’s more valuable than a standard ad because it shows potential buyers how they can wear it. If people who are hesitant about a new fashion style see this how-to video, they might feel more confident in their purchase.

6. How to Asana: Planning with Asana calendar

Asana cleverly brands its how-to video series as “How to Asana,” and all of the videos in the series feature a consistent theme. All of the videos in this series are under two minutes in length, are hosted by the same person, and feature an eye-popping yellow background. The meat of the video consists of a screencast of someone using the Asana calendar tool, but these branding details bring life to what would otherwise be a rather boring video.

Takeaway for marketers: If you’re thinking about creating a how-to video series, take the extra time to make it memorable and recognizable. These efforts will make videos look more professional and will make viewers want to keep tuning in for more helpful videos if they know they can expect more.

7. How to Create an Animated GIF in Photoshop

Who else here loves GIFs? That’s right — everyone loves GIFs.

But before I watched the video above, I had no idea how easy it was to make my own. That’s the ideal reaction to a how-to video, by the way — “that was so easy.”

Adobe’s how-to video is a great example of a software demonstration video because it zooms in on only the necessary information. Instead of confusing the viewer by showing the entire Photoshop interface, the video features magnified animations of only the buttons and tools they need to accomplish the task at hand.

Takeaway for marketers: If you’re making a technology demonstration how-to video, consider how it will appear to any first-time product users watching. Try to minimize any confusion by only filming elements of the technology needed for your video so viewers can follow along on their devices.

8. How to Increase Your Facebook Reach and Outsmart the Algorithm

You might be hesitant to create videos to explain a complicated subject matter, but that could actually be the most effective medium to help your audience understand something.

In this video, my colleague Megan Conley breaks down the many nuances of Facebook’s News Feed algorithm in a clear and concise manner. Then, graphics, animations, and screencasts supplement what she talks about with data visualizations to make the stats and figures more memorable for the viewer. Finally, the video ends with helpful next steps viewers can take to solve the problem outlined in the video. The video isn’t about how to use HubSpot software at all — it’s only in the business of helping people get better results.

Takeaway for marketers: The most compelling how-to video might be one that doesn’t mention your product at all. Think about what questions your audience might be asking and establish your brand as a thought leader with helpful videos that don’t end with a sales pitch.

9. How to Fix a Chair with Noodles

 
 
 

 
 
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How do you say “NOODLES” in your LANGUAGE?🍜☺️ — Credits:(Xiubandrng) — Follow us @Crafty.Life.Hacks for more ramen!

A post shared by Crafts, Hacks, DIYs and more! (@crafty.life.hacks) on Jul 8, 2019 at 1:57pm PDT

This interesting Instagram video from @Crafty.Life.Hacks shows viewers how to fix a wooden chair by replacing missing wood with instant noodles. While this video is short and easy-to-follow it is fascinating because it teaches viewers about an alternative use for an every-day household food item.

Takeaways for marketers: This example shows how a product can have multiple purposes. While marketers will want to make how-to videos that show the primary purpose of their product, sometimes, it can still be helpful to think outside of the box and show off other ways your product could be used.

For example, if you’re selling a food product, you might want to craft a recipe video that shows how it can be used as an ingredient, or a DIY that shows how it can be used as a tool — like the video above.

10. How to Make Momofuku’s King Crab Noodle

In this Facebook video, shared by Vice’s food blog Munchies, Chef Max Ng shows viewers how to cook his grandmother’s King Crab Noodle recipe — which he serves at the Momofuku Ssam Bar in New York City. Although this video is on the longer side, he shows audiences a simple step-by-step cooking process that they can easily follow.

This type of video might be a helpful how-to example for local restaurants or food publications that want to show off their favorite recipes. Promotionally, this video also gives some great brand awareness to Munchies and the Momofuko restaurant.

Takeaways for marketers: You can get away with videos on the longer side if they clearly describe a step-by-step process like cooking. How-to videos can also be a great source for cross-promotional content. In the example above, Max Ng, Momofuko, and Munchies are all highlighted in an entertaining and informative way.

How to Make How-To Videos

Now that you have inspiration from real-life B2B and B2C brand videos, start thinking about how you could create helpful content for your audience.

Create buyer personas and use these to inform your strategy. What types of questions does your audience ask about your product? What questions do they ask about your industry? What problems does your product solve that you could demonstrate in a video?

Use tools like Google Trends and HubSpot’s Keywords tool to learn more about the types of searches your audience is conducting and what content you could create to answer those questions.

Reblogged 1 day ago from blog.hubspot.com

How to Target Featured Snippet Opportunities — Best of Whiteboard Friday

Posted by BritneyMuller

Once you’ve identified where the opportunity to nab a featured snippet lies, how do you go about targeting it? Part One of our “Featured Snippet Opportunities” series focused on how to discover places where you may be able to win a snippet, but today we’re focusing on how to actually make changes that’ll help you do that. 

Joining us at MozCon next week? This video is a great lead up to Britney’s talk: Featured Snippets: Essentials to Know & How to Target.

Give a warm, Mozzy welcome to Britney as she shares pro tips and examples of how we’ve been able to snag our own snippets using her methodology.

Click on the whiteboard image above to open a high-resolution version in a new tab!

Video Transcription

Today, we are going over targeting featured snippets, Part 2 of our featured snippets series. Super excited to dive into this.

What’s a featured snippet?

For those of you that need a little brush-up, what’s a featured snippet? Let’s say you do a search for something like, “Are pigs smarter than dogs?” You’re going to see an answer box that says, “Pigs outperform three-year old human children on cognitive tests and are smarter than any domestic animal. Animal experts consider them more trainable than cats or dogs.” How cool is that? But you’ll likely see these answer boxes for all sorts of things. So something to sort of keep an eye on. How do you become a part of that featured snippet box? How do you target those opportunities?

Last time, we talked about finding keywords that you rank on page one for that also have a featured snippet. There are a couple ways to do that. We talk about it in the first video. Something I do want to mention, in doing some of that the last couple weeks, is that Ahrefs can help you discover your featured snippet opportunities. I had no idea that was possible. Really cool, go check them out. If you don’t have Ahrefs and maybe you have Moz or SEMrush, don’t worry, you can do the same sort of thing with a Vlookup.

So I know this looks a little crazy for those of you that aren’t familiar. Super easy. It basically allows you to combine two sets of data to show you where some of those opportunities are. So happy to link to some of those resources down below or make a follow-up video on how to do just that.

1. Identify

All right. So step one is identifying these opportunities. You want to find the keywords that you’re on page one for that also have this answer box. You want to weigh the competitive search volume against qualified traffic. Initially, you might want to just go after search volume. I highly suggest you sort of reconsider and evaluate where might the qualified traffic come from and start to go after those.

2. Understand

From there, you really just want to understand the intent, more so even beyond this table that I have suggested for you. To be totally honest, I’m doing all of this with you. It’s been a struggle, and it’s been fun, but sometimes this isn’t very helpful. Sometimes it is. But a lot of times I’m not even looking at some of this stuff when I’m comparing the current featured snippet page and the page that we currently rank on page one for. I’ll tell you what I mean in a second.

3. Target

So we have an example of how I’ve been able to already steal one. Hopefully, it helps you. How do you target your keywords that have the featured snippet?

  • Simplifying and cleaning up your pages does wonders. Google wants to provide a very simple, cohesive, quick answer for searchers and for voice searches. So definitely try to mold the content in a way that’s easy to consume.
  • Summaries do well. Whether they’re at the top of the page or at the bottom, they tend to do very, very well.
  • Competitive markup, if you see a current featured snippet that is marked up in a particular way, you can do so to be a little bit more competitive.
  • Provide unique info
  • Dig deeper, go that extra mile, provide something else. Provide that value.

How To Target Featured Snippet Examples

What are some examples? So these are just some examples that I personally have been running into and I’ve been working on cleaning up.

  • Roman numerals. I am trying to target a list result, and the page we currently rank on number one for has Roman numerals. Maybe it’s a big deal, maybe it’s not. I just changed them to numbers to see what’s going to happen. I’ll keep you posted.
  • Fix broken links. But I’m also just going through our page and cleaning it. We have a lot of older content. I’m fixing broken links. I have the Check My Links tool. It’s a Chrome add-on plugin that I just click and it tells me what’s a 404 or what I might need to update.
  • Fixing spelling errors or any grammatical errors that may have slipped through editors’ eyes. I use Grammarly. I have the free version. It works really well, super easy. I’ve even found some super old posts that have the double or triple spacing after a period. It drives me crazy, but cleaning some of that stuff up.
  • Deleting extra markup. You might see some additional breaks, not necessarily like that ampersand. But you know what I mean in WordPress where it’s that weird little thing for that break in the space, you can clean those out. Some extra, empty header markup, feel free to delete those. You’re just cleaning and simplifying and improving your page.

One interesting thing that I’ve come across recently was for the keyword “MozRank.” Our page is beautifully written, perfectly optimized. It has all the things in place to be that featured snippet, but it’s not. That is when I fell back and I started to rely on some of this data. I saw that the current featured snippet page has all these links.

So I started to look into what are some easy backlinks I might be able to grab for that page. I came across Quora that had a question about MozRank, and I noticed that — this is a side tip — you can suggest edits to Quora now, which is amazing. So I suggested a link to our Moz page, and within the notes I said, “Hello, so and so. I found this great resource on MozRank. It completely confirms your wonderful answer. Thank you so much, Britney.”

I don’t know if that’s going to work. I know it’s a nofollow. I hope it can send some qualified traffic. I’ll keep you posted on that. But kind of a fun tip to be aware of.

How we nabbed the “find backlinks” featured snippet

All right. How did I nab the featured snippet “find backlinks”? This surprised me, because I hardly changed much at all, and we were able to steal that featured snippet quite easily. We were currently in the fourth position, and this was the old post that was in the fourth position. These are the updates I made that are now in the featured snippet.

Clean up the title

So we go from the title “How to Find Your Competitor’s Backlinks Next Level” to “How to Find Backlinks.” I’m just simplifying, cleaning it up.

Clean up the H2s

The first H2, “How to Check the Backlinks of a Site.” Clean it up, “How to Find Backlinks?” That’s it. I don’t change step one. These are all in H3s. I leave them in the H3s. I’m just tweaking text a little bit here and there.

Simplify and clarify your explanations/remove redundancies

I changed “Enter your competitor’s domain URL” — it felt a little duplicate — to “Enter your competitor’s URL.” Let’s see. “Export results into CSV,” what kind of results? I changed that to “export backlink data into CSV.” “Compile CSV results from all competitors,” what kind of results? “Compile backlink CSV results from all competitors.”

So you can look through this. All I’m doing is simplifying and adding backlinks to clarify some of it, and we were able to nab that.

So hopefully that example helps. I’m going to continue to sort of drudge through a bunch of these with you. I look forward to any of your comments, any of your efforts down below in the comments. Definitely looking forward to Part 3 and to chatting with you all soon.

Thank you so much for joining me on this edition of Whiteboard Friday. I look forward to seeing you all soon. See you.

Video transcription by Speechpad.com


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Reblogged 2 days ago from feedproxy.google.com

FTC slaps Facebook with long-awaited $5 billion fine for privacy violations

The fine is more than 200x the next largest monetary penalty imposed by the FTC.

Please visit Marketing Land for the full article.

Reblogged 2 days ago from feeds.marketingland.com

How to Identify & Work With the Best Brand Influencers for Your Business

When I scrolled through Instagram this morning on my commute, I commented on a friend’s post about her vacation, scrolled right past an advertisement for a comforter, and double-tapped an influencer’s post about a skincare brand.

That’s the thing about influencers — you follow them for a reason, so you don’t mind interacting with their sponsored content.

I don’t follow this exact influencer because I’m interested in her skincare routine. Instead, I follow her because she’s an editor of a major magazine that I enjoy reading, and her content interests me. Since I trust her opinion, I’d definitely check out any skincare brands she endorses.

Even though influencer marketing is a well-known marketing channel by now, it’s always important to reiterate that your customers trust the opinions of others — and that majorly impacts buying decisions.

In fact, nearly 90% of all marketers find ROI from influencer marketing comparable to, or better than, other marketing channels.

So how can you identify the right brand influencers to work for your business? First, it’s important to know what a brand influencer is, and determine the best way to connect with them — on, or offline.

If you work for a SaaS platform company, odds are you won’t be reaching out to Beyonce to promote your product. Even if she did want to work with you, her audience likely doesn’t fit your target audience or buyer personas.

Reaching out to random people with thousands or even millions of followers is a very transactional way to go about an influencer marketing strategy. The strategy becomes transactional because your business is completely focused on the influencer’s follower count, and the influencer takes on a product endorsement role, rather than being a brand ambassador.

A better way to do it is by putting your relationship with the influencer first. The number of followers they have shouldn’t be nearly as important as their fit with your brand and how their content resonates with both your audiences. Often, these influencers will be involved with your business long-term if you customize your content to their brand as well, and prove that you value their partnership.

Now that we’ve defined an influencer, let’s explore how to find the best ones for your industry.

How to Find Brand Influencers for Your Industry

How can you determine the right “fit” with a brand influencer? Business/influencer fit will become extremely important for your future collaborations, so be sure to nail down the following criteria:

1. Figure out your target audience.

A target audience can be split by many factors — including demographic, geographic, and behavioral, to name a few. Common ways to segment an audience is by age, gender, location, behavior, lifestyle, values, and interests. As you begin to narrow your audience, you’ll dive into the types of marketing strategies and content that will resonate most with them.

Determining your target audience will ensure that your audience is similar to that of your influencer’s. Otherwise, your content will fall flat and won’t inspire users to take action.

A great example of business/influencer fit is how many sportswear brands, like Nike and Puma, partner with popular athletes to create both products and content. If you’re a fan of Lebron James, you probably already know he’s sponsored by Nike — and that partnership goes a long way for Nike’s business.

2. Research Influencers.

Obviously, the best place to research your influencers is on social media — but let’s break it down into more concrete steps.

The easiest way to find the right brand influencers is to see if any are already talking about your business. Social monitoring or searching for your brand on social media sites are great ways to get started, and listening tools can help you find influencers who are already interested in your industry.

Another tip for researching influencers is to search for relevant hashtags. If you’re a health and wellness brand looking for an influencer, searching for “#health, #wellness, #sponsored, #ad” on Instagram will bring you to influencers who have already posted industry-relevant content. If you see a post that catches your eye, check out the rest of the influencer’s engagement on other posts.

Keep in mind that influencers can have smaller, devoted followings — so don’t turn away from someone just because they have fewer followers than what you initially had in mind. Additionally, look out for influencers who are already posting your competitor’s brands, as well.

If you see an influencer’s post on Instagram that may resonate with your brand, try looking for similar profiles. Next to the “Follow” button on Instagram, there’s a down arrow. By clicking the down arrow, you’ll see a list of suggested users. Scroll through those and see if any might be willing to take you on.

3. Determine relevance.

Take a look at your own content. What is your brand’s aesthetic, and what tone do you use in your copy? What are the underlying messages you’re trying to communicate?

It’s important to see how aligned your influencer’s content is with your own. Obviously, their social presence shouldn’t be filled with posts exactly like yours, but their messaging should be similar since you are targeting a specific audience.

Engagement is also an indicator of relevance for your brand. If the influencer’s audience isn’t engaged with their content, partnering with your brand won’t make a difference. It’s important to figure out whether the influencer’s followers are commenting and sharing their content, or just liking it.

Additionally, do similar users return to comment and like content, time and time again? This implies the influencer’s audience enjoys engaging with the influencer and likes the content she promotes.

Now that you’ve done your initial research, and hopefully conducted a list of possible influencers for your brand to work with, it’s time to connect.

You want to reach out to influencers without seeming spammy or too transactional. Relationships are key, after all. And if you have a bad relationship with your brand influencer, odds are they won’t continue to post on your behalf.

Connecting with Influencers

1. Reach out…strategically.

Cold emailing or direct messaging an influencer isn’t a great strategy for relationship building. If you have an interest in working with an influencer, try courting them first.

What I mean by this is, you should subscribe to their blog, follow all their social channels, and comment on their posts. Influencers work hard on their content, just like your business does. If you want an influencer to take notice of your business, you have to be interested in what they’re doing, as well. Beginning a partnership by interacting on the channels you hope to work together on will demonstrate your interest.

Some influencers have a presence on multiple social media platforms. It’s your job to know how they want to be contacted for business partnerships. If they have a business email in their Instagram bio, that’s likely the best choice. Alternatively, maybe they have an inquiries section on their blog. Whatever the case is, make sure to send a personal message that doesn’t feel like it’s been generated by a template.

2. Make a human connection.

Sending messages into the digital universe is a scary feeling because you don’t know when or if you’ll ever hear back. Making a connection in the real world is much more actionable, and puts a face to your business.

This doesn’t mean you should go out and stalk your list of influencers until you meet in person.

If you’re serious about making a connection, try attending or hosting an influencer event.

Bringing influencers to you will make connecting with them much easier, and give them an opportunity to interact with your brand before agreeing to work with you.

Many marketers are learning to market themselves as well as their business. Hopefully, you’ve been growing your network, as well — so you may already have connections to your influencers.

If you have someone who is at the very top of your list, see if they’re following someone you know. Maybe they’ve worked with a similar brand in the past, and you know someone on that team. The world is smaller than we think, and you might just be sitting on a goldmine of potential relationships.

3. Manage your outreach efforts.

Like any other marketing strategy, influencer outreach should be organized and well-documented. The last thing you want is to accidentally reach out to the same influencer on four different platforms with the same message. Yikes.

After reaching out, be sure to give an influencer some time before a follow-up. Just like in a sales pitch, you don’t want to be overbearing or clingy. Be respectful of the influencer’s time — if they want to work with you, they’ll respond to your outreach.

You should also be documenting what outreach strategies work for you. Maybe after a first email, you’ve found success in hopping on a call with potential influencers. Knowing what works for you will help you further develop your outreach strategy, and enable you to be more creative in the future.

To recap, brand influencers can help you:

  • Build and expand a devoted following
  • Increase your word-of-mouth marketing efforts
  • Bring in more sales, leads, and conversions
  • Create more human relationships with your potential customers

The right influencers are inherently interested in your brand, believe in your mission, and are capable of communicating about your business eloquently.

Focusing on long-term relationships with your influencers will continue to build their knowledge of your company, and will bring the best results.

Next, take a look at The Ultimate List of Instagram Influencers in Every Industry (94 and Counting!) to begin researching the ideal influencers for your brand.

Reblogged 2 days ago from blog.hubspot.com

July Updates to Paid Advertising Platforms

Microsoft Advertising What: Released ad customizers Details: Released ad customizers to improve ad effectiveness. Learn more during our PPC Newsflash >> Impact: Allows for increased scalability and more targeted messaging. Also connects with Google Import Tool.   Google Ads What: Audience updates to App campaigns Details: App campaigns are geared to making it easier to […]

Read more at PPCHero.com

Reblogged 2 days ago from feedproxy.google.com

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