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Is Ripoff Report subverting Google take-downs?

Previously de-indexed Ripoff Report pages are reappearing and ranking prominently again in Google. Columnist Chris Silver Smith takes a close look at how the site is eluding Google’s page removal processes and how defamation victims — and Google — can fight back.

The post Is Ripoff Report…

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

Reblogged 2 years ago from feeds.searchengineland.com

Marketing Day: Top video creators in March, Google Analytics new home page & more

Here’s our recap of what happened in online marketing today, as reported on Marketing Land and other places across the web.

Please visit Marketing Land for the full article.

Reblogged 2 years ago from feeds.marketingland.com

Cracking Programming Interviews: 500 Questions with Solutions

Part I Algorithms and Data Structures

1 Fundamentals

Approximating the square root of a number

Generating Permutation Efficiently

Unique 5-bit Sequences

Select Kth Smallest Element

The Non-Crooks Problem

Is this (almost) sorted?

Sorting an almost sorted list

The Longest Upsequence Problem

Fixed size generic array in C++

Seating Problem

Segment Problems

Exponentiation

Searching two-dimensional sorted array

Hamming Problem

Constant Time Range Query

Linear Time Sorting

Writing a Value as the Sum of Squares

The Celebrity Problem

Transport Problem

Find Length of the rope

Switch Bulb Problem

In, On or Out

The problem of the balanced seg

The problem of the most isolated villages

2 Arrays

The Plateau Problem

Searching in Two Dimensional Sequence

The Welfare Crook Problem

2D Array Rotation

A Queuing Problem in A Post Office

Interpolation Search

Robot Walk

Linear Time Sorting

Write as sum of consecutive positive numbers

Print 2D Array in Spiral Order

The Problem of the Circular Racecourse

Sparse Array Trick

Bulterman’s Reshuffling Problem

Finding the majority

Mode of a Multiset

Circular Array

Find Median of two sorted arrays

Finding the missing integer

Finding the missing number with sorted columns

Re-arranging an array

Switch and Bulb Problem

Compute sum of sub-array

Find a number not sum of subsets of array

Kth Smallest Element in Two Sorted Arrays

Sort a sequence of sub-sequences

Find missing integer

Inplace Reversing

Find the number not occurring twice in an array

3 Trees

Lowest Common Ancestor(LCA) Problem

Spying Campaign

4 Dynamic Programming

Stage Coach Problem

Matrix Multiplication

TSP Problem

A Simple Path Problem

String Edit Distance

Music recognition

Max Sub-Array Problem

5 Graphs

Reliable distribution

Independent Set

Party Problem

6 Miscellaneous

Compute Next Higher Number

Searching in Possibly Empty Two Dimensional Sequence

Matching Nuts and Bolts Optimally

Random-number generation

Weighted Median

Compute a^n

Compute a^n revisited

Compute the product a × b

Compute the quotient and remainder

Compute GCD

Computed Constrained GCD

Alternative Euclid’ Algorithm

Revisit Constrained GCD

Compute Square using only addition and subtraction

Factorization

Factorization Revisited

Decimal Representation

Reverse Decimal Representation

Solve Inequality

Solve Inequality Revisited

Print Decimal Representation

Decimal Period Length

Sequence Periodicity Problem

Compute Function

Emulate Division and Modulus Operations

Sorting Array of Strings : Linear Time

LRU data structure

Exchange Prefix and Suffix

7 Parallel Algorithms

Parallel Addition

Find Maximum

Parallel Prefix Problem

Finding Ranks in Linked Lists

Finding the k th Smallest Element

8 Low Level Algorithms

Manipulating Rightmost Bits

Counting 1-Bits

Counting the 1-bits in an Array

Computing Parity of a word

Counting Leading/Trailing 0’s

Bit Reversal

Bit Shuffling

Integer Square Root

Newton’s Method

Integer Exponentiation

LRU Algorithm

Shortest String of 1-Bits

Fibonacci words

Computation of Power of 2

Round to a known power of 2

Round to Next Power of 2

Reblogged 2 years ago from www.amazon.com

Execute the Job Interview – Second Edition (May 2013)

Ever wondered what all the employees at Google, IBM, Amazon, Microsoft, and Oracle have in common. How did they land jobs at these amazing companies…

The secret sauce is their well-informed choices and the art of positioning to the company.

The world of IT is not the more the same as early 2000s. The global IT giants such as Google, IBM, Oracle, Microsoft, Amazon etc. have established clear leadership over thousands of other IT companies and have set highest standards of interviewing. That said, the aspiring job seekers need to know what it takes to get though multiple rounds of those intriguing interview sessions.

Author of this 700-page book “Execute the Job Interview”, provides insider’s view on what the world’s top IT companies are looking for. He blends his 12 year career with Microsoft, Samsung, Aricent, and 8-year long IT consulting expertise spread across USA, India, China and South Korea.

Several sections of this book, as described below, provide the most comprehensive and authentic information on interview preparation:

Understanding the candidate
—————————-
This part provides examples of structured and effective responses to behavioral questions such as self-introduction, skills, job fit, career choices etc., and approach to building strong resumes that attract attention of top recruiters.

Proven competencies and skills
——————————
This part covers questions asked on past work experience and how the candidate can transfer soft and hard skills to the new job.

Problem Solving
—————
This part, which forms bulk of the book, covers two areas:

Algorithms – Sorting Approaches, Searching Approaches, Brute-Force Approach, Greedy Approaches, Task Scheduling Algorithm, Huffman Codes, Longest Common Subsequence, Naïve String Matching, Rabin-Karp Algorithm,NP-Completeness Algorithms, Red-Black Trees,B-Trees,Graph Traversals,Hash Tables and much more…

Coding – Partition The Array Of Balls, Adding Two N-Bit Binary Integers,Trie Data Structure To Store Words, Algorithm To Do Wild Card String Matching, Compress String, Convert A BST Into A Linked List,N-Ary Tree, Graph’s Breadth First Traversal, Shuffling A Deck Of Cards and much more…

Lateral thinking
—————-
This part covers abstract open-ended case questions, which require presence of mind and strategic approach to solving problems out of candidate’s area of concern. For example, ‘How would you design a new browser? ‘or ‘How will you design a new operating system?’ or even ‘How would you design a railway track?

Reblogged 2 years ago from www.amazon.com

Execute the Job Interview

JobInterview.exe
Ever wondered what all the employees at Google, IBM, Amazon, Microsoft, and Oracle have in common. How did they land jobs at these amazing companies…

The secret sauce is their well-informed choices and the art of positioning to the company.

The world of IT is not the more the same as early 2000s. The global IT giants such as Google, IBM, Oracle, Microsoft, Amazon etc. have established clear leadership over thousands of other IT companies and have set highest standards of interviewing. That said, the aspiring job seekers need to know what it takes to get though multiple rounds of those intriguing interview sessions.

Author of this 700-page book “Execute the Job Interview”, provides insider’s view on what the world’s top IT companies are looking for. He blends his 12 year career with Microsoft, Samsung, Aricent, and 8-year long IT consulting expertise spread across USA, India, China and South Korea.

Several sections of this book, as described below, provide the most comprehensive and authentic information on interview preparation:

Understanding the candidate
—————————-
This part provides examples of structured and effective responses to behavioral questions such as self-introduction, skills, job fit, career choices etc., and approach to building strong resumes that attract attention of top recruiters.

Proven competencies and skills
——————————
This part covers questions asked on past work experience and how the candidate can transfer soft and hard skills to the new job.
Problem Solving
—————
This part, which forms bulk of the book, covers two areas:

Algorithms – Sorting Approaches, Searching Approaches, Brute-Force Approach, Greedy Approaches, Task Scheduling Algorithm, Huffman Codes, Longest Common Subsequence, Naïve String Matching, Rabin-Karp Algorithm,NP-Completeness Algorithms, Red-Black Trees,B-Trees,Graph Traversals,Hash Tables and much more…

Coding – Partition The Array Of Balls, Adding Two N-Bit Binary Integers,Trie Data Structure To Store Words, Algorithm To Do Wild Card String Matching, Compress String, Convert A BST Into A Linked List,N-Ary Tree, Graph’s Breadth First Traversal, Shuffling A Deck Of Cards and much more…

Lateral thinking
—————-
This part covers abstract open-ended case questions, which require presence of mind and strategic approach to solving problems out of candidate’s area of concern. For example, ‘How would you design a new browser? ‘or ‘How will you design a new operating system?’ or even ‘How would you design a railway track?

Product Features

  • Used Book in Good Condition

Reblogged 2 years ago from www.amazon.com

Here’s a script that copies audiences to all your campaigns

Columnist Daniel Gilbert of Brainlabs shares a nifty shortcut for replicating audiences across campaigns.

The post Here’s a script that copies audiences to all your campaigns appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

Reblogged 2 years ago from feeds.searchengineland.com

Bing Ads Editor gets Review Extension support, better keyword import & more

New changes to Bing Ads Editor enhance the keyword import process, add support for Review Extensions and save advertisers a step when creating remarketing audiences.

The post Bing Ads Editor gets Review Extension support, better keyword import & more appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

Reblogged 2 years ago from feeds.searchengineland.com

SearchCap: Google webspam report, Bing Ads Editor update & Ripoff report in Google

Below is what happened in search today, as reported on Search Engine Land and from other places across the web.

The post SearchCap: Google webspam report, Bing Ads Editor update & Ripoff report in Google appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

Reblogged 2 years ago from feeds.searchengineland.com

New Google Earth delivers guided tours, 3D images & an ‘I’m feeling lucky’ feature

It’s currently only available on Chrome and Android, but Google says its latest version of Google Earth will soon roll out on iOS and other browsers.

The post New Google Earth delivers guided tours, 3D images & an ‘I’m feeling lucky’ feature appeared first on Search Engine…

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

Reblogged 2 years ago from feeds.searchengineland.com

How to Interview Designers (Even If You Know Nothing About Design)

It’s intimidating to interview designers, especially if you don’t know much about design. What questions do you ask? How do you judge the answers? How do you effectively evaluate a creative person if you don’t consider yourself a “creative”?

1. Get familiar with good design

As a non-designer, it’s important to first familiarize yourself with good design. Pay a visit to designer portfolio websites like Coroflot, Behance and Dribbble. You can filter results to see design types that are relevant to the role you’re trying to fill, whether it’s graphic designer, illustrator, web designer, or anything in between.

Then, take a look at design showcase websites for more inspiration. A few places to start: Abduzeedo, Designspiration, The Best Designs, and Under Consideration.

If you know what quality design looks like, you’ll feel more confident talking to designers in an interview setting. What constitutes “good” design changes frequently, so check these websites on a regular basis to stay aware of what’s trendy and what’s passe’.

2. Pay attention to their resume

“You can get some good insight into a designer’s skill set by looking at the visual quality of their resume,” says John Howells, Associate Creative Director at digital agency Situation Interactive and an accomplished designer. “Generally, if it looks like it was created in MS Word in Times New Roman—or worse, Comic Sans—you can make a pretty good assessment that the designer is a bit uninspired.”

John’s advice? “I always take a look at the presentation of their resume. Is there something special about it? Heavier paper? A custom shape? Is it crisp, or is it crinkled after being pulled out of a bag? All of these things will give a good indication of the designers’ attention to detail.” (Or lack thereof.)

3. Talk through a project, from start to finish

In any business, design is more than a pretty picture. Design has to adhere to a strategy, solve a problem, convey a message, and meet strict specifications. Pick a design from your interviewee’s portfolio and ask them to talk you through their creative process, from beginning to end.

A few questions to ask:

  • Who was the client for this project?
  • What was the problem that needed to be solved?
  • What was your strategy and approach?
  • How were your initial iterations different from this final product?
  • How did you handle feedback from internal teams and external clients?
  • How did you keep files and assets clean and organized?
  • What pitfalls did you encounter?
  • What was the most challenging aspect of this project?
  • What were your metrics of success?
  • Do you consider this project a success? Why or why not?

Keep an eye out for a designer who throws colleagues and clients under the bus during these questions. That’s a big red flag.

4. Focus on teamwork

“For those without a design eye, It’s always a good idea to ask designers what their specific role was in the projects shown in their portfolio,” says Howells. “Oftentimes, they work within a larger team and may not be responsible for all (or the better parts) of the project.”

If you see gorgeous work in a portfolio, don’t assume that the designer is responsible for it 100%. Especially in the world of web design, assets are often created elsewhere and provided to the designer to manipulate.

To better understand your interviewee’s experience and skills, ask questions like:

  • What was your role on this project? (If the answer is unclear to you, don’t be afraid to ask them to elaborate.)
  • Did you create these assets from scratch, or rework existing assets?
  • How did you collaborate with others on this project? (Creative director, senior designer, developer, copywriter, strategist, project manager, client, account executives, marketing department, junior designer, etc.)
  • What’s one excellent suggestion from your team that improved this design?

Howells adds: “It’s also a great way to see how passionate and inspired designers are by the work they do and how big a team player they are. And, of course, if they will fit in with the larger team.”

Just like in any interview, you should aim to find out if the candidate will play well with others. Ask questions about collaboration and communication, and you’ll know right away whether a designer candidate is right for your company.

Looking to hire the best designers? Post your job listing on Mediabistro today.

The post How to Interview Designers (Even If You Know Nothing About Design) appeared first on Mediabistro.

Reblogged 2 years ago from www.mediabistro.com